The Hansen House Part 13: The Loft

In continuation with the great room, I thought that it would be best to cover the loft area next. The loft consists of a sitting area and a balcony through which the chimney extends up through. Hansen_05-08-13 031 Photo May 09, 2 45 03 PM Hansen_05-08-13 026 The custom fireplace and chimney, made with stone found around the property, was built by Stonescapes Inc. of Hockessin, DE. The intersection of the chimney through the balcony creates a lovely, small sitting area that is a perfect spot to read a book. Hansen_05-08-13 030 Hansen Finished (29) Hansen_05-08-13 033 Hansen Finished (17) The loft also has a larger seating area located above the kitchen. Hansen Finished (7) Hansen_05-08-13 020 Hansen_05-08-13 023 Hansen_05-08-13 027 2 The railings and balusters were hand forged by Harris Metalsmith Studio LLC and are simple twisted picket design, painted Satin Black with an Oak cap rail. Hansen Finished (15) Hansen Finished (27) Hansen Finished (33) The floors in the loft are Wormy Maple. Hansen_05-08-13 024
This door leads to an office/media room as well as the guest room

This door leads to an office/media room as well as the guest room

Above the sitting are in the loft is a cupola. The cupola assists in passive ventilation. Hansen_05-08-13 022 Hansen Finished (16)

The Hansen House Part 9: Insulation & Interior Systems

White PVC pipes run under the slab where the domestic hot and cold running water tubes are housed and run.  These plumbing tubes are part of the Hansen House’s wet wall, a structural wall designed to house plumbing pipes for fixtures like sinks, dishwashers, washing machines and toilets. Hansen_10-08-12_001 Hansen_12-14-12 063 The tubes are connected into the manifold and then distributed throughout the house to the designated fixture.  Consolidating plumbing in a single wall increases efficiency as well as cutting down on building costs. Hansen_12-14-12 024 Hansen_12-14-12 062 The black PEX tubes are for the radiant floor heat which also run to the manifold where the water will be heated by an electric water heater.  The PEX tubing was attached to the rebar which was laid out in a checkerboard pattern on top of the foundation’s 4″ of insulation.  Then concrete was poured to form the slab. Hansen_10-08-12_002 Hansen_07-13-12 005 The kitchen island location and outline were marked by tape on the floor for reference points. Hansen_10-08-12_005 After the plumbing tubes were all in place, the cellulose insulation could be sprayed.  Netting was installed on ceilings and walls to hold the blown in cellulose in place.  The netting was used so that the drywall would not have to be installed before the insulation was blown in, which could cause moisture problems. Hansen_12-14-12 012 Hansen_12-14-12 028 The windows and doors were covered with plastic to be protected during the spray insulation process.  Polyurethane, the yellowish material, was sprayed to seal any plywood seams to ensure a tight building envelope. Hansen_12-14-12 045 Hansen_12-14-12 043 Hansen_12-14-12 044 Because the insulation is blown in an excess of material tends to accumulate; therefore, while one person blows in the cellulose another person vacuums it up where it is sent back to the truck and recycled back through the process. Hansen_12-14-12 102 Hansen_12-14-12 105 The metal braces seen in the picture below are part of the t-bracing which prevents lateral movement.  Rigid foam was added to the cavity so that settling of the insulation was minimized and controlled. IMG_7988 IMG_7989 IMG_7991 IMG_7994

The Hansen House Part 5: Timber Framing & Roof SIP’s

Quick photo update on the Hansen House:
Douglas Fir Timber Frame

Douglas Fir Timber Frame

Hansen TF Raising2_08-23-12 011
2x8 Southern Yellow Pine Roof Decking

2×8 Southern Yellow Pine Roof Decking

Hansen_09-13-12 008
Roof SIP's

Roof SIP’s

R-45 Roof SIP's

R-45 Roof SIP’s

Hansen_09-13-12 011
Roof SIP's

Roof SIP’s