The Hansen House Part 4: Framing

Sill seal was installed in between the concrete foundation and the sill plate to reduce air infiltration.  Sill seal was installed all around the house. A termite shield was installed between the foundation and the sill plates’ wooden components that are joined to the foundation. The termite shield is a metal barrier shaped in a way that diverts water from running down the face of the wall and eliminates the movement of termites from the soil into wood framing members. The garage was framed out with 2×6’s and engineered framing materials to create open and useful spaces.  The 2-car garage also has a back portion that is designated for the homeowner’s motorcycle collection. I-joists were installed in the garage to support the bonus room above the garage. The end of the parallel strand lumber (PSL) beam was cut to create the opening for the stairwell.  The PSL beam allows the floor to end so that the motorcycle section of the garage is open to the above.  PSL’s are strong and have a high load carrying ability. While the garage was being framed out, the crew started on the rest of the house. The garage roof slopes in a way that adds dimension to the roofline and style to the entire structure.  This roofline, along with the motorcycle collection, help define the atmosphere of the garage. The beam in the picture below was salvaged from one of the barns on the property.  This is just one of the many reclaimed/found items that the owners wanted our design team to incorporate in the design of their house. The beam was repurposed and used to create the entryway from the foyer into the office.

Open Building Methods

A note from HJLCMS’s president and founder, Hugh J. Lofting, on open building methods… We, at HJLCMS, practice “open building” methods of construction.  This concept considers a housing project is never completed; it is always under construction.  In order to achieve these goals we think of ways to make access to electrical, plumbing and HVAC easy and adaptable in the building.  One of the obvious ways to achieve this is to use “open web” floor joists.  As long as there are access ports to the floor joists, it is easy to add mechanical and electrical needs in the future.  Another principle of open building that comes into play is spanning the entire width of the buildings in order to reduce the need of bearing walls.  This is also achieved with the open web floor joists.