The Hansen House Part 8: The Windows

The black tar paper around the window openings is for durability and to protect the window sills. Hansen_12-12-12 003 Hansen_12-12-12 002 As you can see below, the corners of the openings have water and ice shield for further protection. Hansen_12-14-12 001 The InLine Fiberglass windows are triple pane low-e casements with fold down cranks and colonial grids between the window panes. Hansen_12-12-12 004 Hansen_12-12-12 005 All of the windows in the Hansen House have white exteriors and Oak laminate interiors, except for the windows in the garage which have brownstone exteriors and Oak laminate interiors. DSC00467 DSC00469 Using the window orientation as a reference point to help determine where the sconce should go, our Project Manager had the great idea to put the sconce on a 2×4 and have the homeowner move it up and down the wall to help him visualize where he wanted it placed. Hansen_12-12-12 010 Hansen_12-12-12 013 These exterior shots show the timber framed side porch, without the roof on it yet, and the installed windows.  The Marvin Integrity Center Hinge French Doors with sliding screen are found on by the side porch and off of the front of the great room. DSC00462 DSC00464 This custom entry door’s arch matches the arches of the existing barn and mill house. DSC00476hansen door trimmed The arched door is located under the timber framed entry way which is part of the wrap around front porch. DSC00482 DSC00492 The next post will cover the spray cellulose insulation so check back to learn all about it!

The Hansen House Part 7: Exterior Stone Work

The reclaimed stone for the Hansen house was found on the property.  The original owners had purchased the stone from a church was that being dismantled because it matched the stone used for the original farmhouse. Hansen_11-02-12_002 Hansen_11-02-12_014 Hansen_11-02-12_018 KeeneStone cut 1” is a 3-dimensional drainage device for 1.0” masonry cavity wall applications.  They are designed to catch and hold mortar droppings while allowing moisture to pass through and drain out of the wall as well as suspending mortar drippings above the weep holes to prevent the drainage channels from becoming blocked or clogged. Hansen_11-02-12_017 Hansen_11-07-12_003 Hansen_11-07-12_004 The marble cornerstones are also reclaimed from the property.  On some of these marble pieces, the drill holes from the original mining process. Hansen_11-02-12_009 Hansen_11-02-12_010 Hansen_11-02-12_012 Hansen Progress_11-30-12 004 Hansen Progress_11-30-12 005 The masons from Stonescapes, Inc. did a beautiful job on both the chimney and the stone walls as seen in these amazing detail shots. Hansen_11-07-12_001 Hansen_11-08-12_002 Hansen_11-08-12_003 The arched door matches the radius of the doorways in the barn and the well house. Hansen Progress_11-30-12 006 Hansen Progress_11-30-12 007 These exterior shots show the craftsmanship of the masons and a quick preview of what is to come. Hansen Progress_11-21-12 013 Hansen Progress_11-30-12 003 DSC00482 DSC00492 Check back for the next update on the installation of the windows.

The Hansen House Part 6: The Fireplace & Chimney

The fireplace insert is a Mendota Gas Fireplace.  Mendota Gas Fireplaces offer BurnGreen technology featuring environmentally friendly practices such as adjustment of heat and blower output, which allows the user to conserve fuel.  To maximize combustion efficiency and preserve indoor air quality, the direct vent design uses 100% outside air for combustion. IMG_0507 IMG_0514 IMG_0515 Once the fireplace was connected and tested then the framework for the stone chimney could be constructed. Hansen_11-02-12_004 Hansen_11-02-12_005 Hansen_11-02-12_006 The face of the fireplace was protected while the custom stone chimney was built around it. Hansen_11-08-12_006 Hansen_11-08-12_007 Hansen_11-08-12_009 Local stone artisans from Stonescapes Inc. were the masonry contractors who created this beautiful chimney.
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The drill marks are visible from the original mining process are visible on the large marble stones.

Hansen Progress_11-21-12 004 The chimney is two stories high and extends through the second story loft.
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The loft floor decking framework is visible at the top of this photo.

Hansen Progress_11-21-12 005 The combination of wood and stone provide beautiful details.  The stone was reclaimed from around the property.
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Note the texture of the stone.

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The Hansen House Part 5: Timber Framing & Roof SIP’s

Quick photo update on the Hansen House:
Douglas Fir Timber Frame

Douglas Fir Timber Frame

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2x8 Southern Yellow Pine Roof Decking

2×8 Southern Yellow Pine Roof Decking

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Roof SIP's

Roof SIP’s

R-45 Roof SIP's

R-45 Roof SIP’s

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Roof SIP's

Roof SIP’s

The Hansen House Part 3: Concrete Slab/Radiant Heat

The month of July has been very busy at the Hansen House.  Once the insulated foundation was complete the plumbing pipes, as well as mechanical conduit piping, were laid out, run and installed. Plumbing pipes have to be run at a slight downhill slope so that the waste in the pipes can drain properly. Weld-On P-68 primer was used to help join the pipe and fittings.  This low VOC product is compliant with LEED Green Building Rating System and can be credited towards indoor environment quality. The same GreenGuard rigid insulation that was used with the foundation walls was installed before the slab was poured.  These products contain up to 30% post-industrial recycled content and help reduce energy consumption and improve durability. On top of the 4 inches of insulation the rebar was laid out in a checkerboard pattern used to reinforce the concrete and prevent cracking.  The PEX tubing for the radiant floors is also attached to the rebar structure. PEX tubing is a tough, flexible plastic that is easy to layout in loops and bent around corners.  The PEX tubing is where the warm water is circulated to heat the radiant floors. Select floors throughout the Hansen House will have radiant heat.  The PEX tubing for the radiant heat will run to the manifold in the mechanical room.  Here it will be heated with an electric water heater and pumped back through the piping.  The electric water heater will be run on energy generated from future solar panels. The concrete is then poured over the PEX tubing and rebar. Using products made from recycled materials is a standard operating procedure for HJLCMS.  The concrete for the Hansen House was made with 20% fly ash and is sourced locally.  This recycled material content is closely tracked should the need for LEED certification be considered. Fly ash makes the concrete more durable, water-resistant and stronger.  Fly ash shrinks the environmental footprint of concrete because it reduces the amount of water and Portland cement in the mix. Once the concrete had set, the power trowel was run over the surface to smooth out any imperfections and get a tight, glossy finish.  The more passes with the power trowel will give you a more glossy finish. The broom finish on the concrete floors for the wrap around porches gives a unique and distinguishing feel to these outside areas. A material called River Jack was added to the concrete as the aggregate giving the East porch a textured surface. Check back for the next post as the crew begins to frame out the garage.

Open Building Methods

A note from HJLCMS’s president and founder, Hugh J. Lofting, on open building methods… We, at HJLCMS, practice “open building” methods of construction.  This concept considers a housing project is never completed; it is always under construction.  In order to achieve these goals we think of ways to make access to electrical, plumbing and HVAC easy and adaptable in the building.  One of the obvious ways to achieve this is to use “open web” floor joists.  As long as there are access ports to the floor joists, it is easy to add mechanical and electrical needs in the future.  Another principle of open building that comes into play is spanning the entire width of the buildings in order to reduce the need of bearing walls.  This is also achieved with the open web floor joists.

The Hansen House Part 2: Foundation

Since HJLCMS broke ground on June 1st on the Hansen House, there has been a lot of progress on site.  We wanted to make sure that none of the trees were unnecessarily disturbed by the construction process so signs were placed at drip lines of the trees to protect the root systems. The new driveway was engineered to share a portion of the existing driveway to reduce the footprint of new construction.  Gravel was used because it is a permeable surface that allows rainwater to be absorbed and therefore naturally filtered. Once the driveway was complete, the crew excavated the area for the house and dug out the footers. The Hansen House is designed as an energy-efficient building.  One of the keys to an energy-efficient building is the use of high levels of insulation.  The concrete footers and block foundation both contribute to the super insulated slab and insulated slab ledge. Because heat is lost through foundation walls and concrete slabs, it is important to insulate them.  There is 2” rigid foam insulation along the perimeter walls of the block foundation.  The foundation is part of the house’s thermal envelope.  A clear penetrating sealer has been applied on all perimeter walls from the footers to the tops of walls to damp proof the foundation.  The insulated foundation contributes to the conservation of energy and heating and cooling costs and also eliminates potential moisture and mold problems. Check back for the next phase of construction.

Under Construction – KSQ Barn/Carriage Shed Update 2

HJLCMS has been very busy finishing up the KSQ Barn/Carriage Shed. The last update ended with the exterior being prepared for the siding and the installation of the standing seam metal roof. However, before the siding could go on, the windows had to be installed and the electric had to be run. Once the windows were in and the electric had been run, the siding could be installed. The material for the exterior finish is rough sawn board and batten for the first story and a cedar shake for the second story, upper gables and cupola. While this was going on, one of the HLTF crew members was building the cupola in our shop. The cupola was then transported to the job site where it was finished with cedar shakes and standing seam metal roofing.  This cupola is not solely ornamental, as it will function as passive climate control as well as house the ventilating fan. The cupola was then flown into place with the crane. Check back for the next update.

Under Construction – KSQ Barn/Carriage Shed Update

Hugh J. Lofting Construction Management Services, LLC (HJLCMS) is currently working on completing the construction of a timber framed carriage shed that had been raised by its sister company, Hugh Lofting Timber Framing, Inc. (HLTF).  Once the HLTF crew had completed raising the two-story 24×36 Oak timber frame, HJLCMS took the reins and began enclosing the structure. The frame sits upon an insulated concrete slab, which contains pex tubing for a radiant heat system.  This heated floor along with the tightly insulated walls should allow the homeowner a comfortable working environment even in the dead of winter. The 1×10 Eastern White Pine tongue & groove roof decking was the first component of the built up wall system to be installed on the timber frame skeleton. As the decking was going down, felt paper was applied to protect the roof decking from the elements. Once the roof was ‘dried-in’, the interior finish made up of 1×10 tongue & groove, eastern white pine was applied to the exterior side of the timbers to complete the first layer of the built up wall system. The white pine 1×10 T&G applied to the outside of the carriage shed beautifully highlights the exposed timber frame. Once the white pine decking was in place, the rigid foam insulation was then ready to be applied to the entire structure. The two layers of 2” EPS rigid foam board is the insulation for the carriage shed.  These two layers are staggered to offset the seams, which will help to reduce air infiltration. Lath, which acts as a nailing surface for the exterior siding, is applied directly to the rigid foam insulation. The added air space from the lath is helpful as it allows any moisture that may find its way behind the siding to dry out.  The second story siding will be cedar shakes while the first story will be 1×12 board and batten. In preparation for the cedar siding, the lath on the second story will be installed horizontally across the vertical members creating a breathable lattice framework. The standing seam metal roof is 24-gauge steel with a medium bronze finish. Check back for more updates as the construction process continues.

Off-The-Grid Home

Just south of Annapolis, Maryland HJLCMS constructed an off-the-grid home.  Tucked far back from the road the property enjoys the peace and quiet of farmland views and a backdrop of forest. But don’t let the bucolic surroundings or the craftsman appearance fool you. This new residence is a thoroughly up-to-date, sustainable home filled with cutting edge technology that had a very aggressive mission – provide a modern lifestyle for a family of four while minimizing their footprint on the Earth. This project’s environmental highlights include:
  • Creating a beautiful structure that brings joy for many generations
  • Generate all electricity on-site
  • Source all domestic and landscape water from rainwater capture or on-site resources
  • Maintain all storm water on-site through capture or infiltration
  • Use of local tradespeople and utilizing natural, local and/or recycled materials
  • Minimize construction disturbance and waste
  • Create and maintain a healthy indoor environment
  • Off-the-grid living
HJLCMS and Hugh Lofting Timber Framing (HLTF) designed and built the home to work with the Earth.  “The house is sited to maximize passive solar gain in the winter but is designed to be shaded from too much sun in the summer,” says Hugh Lofting, company president. Concrete floors and a real fireplace, made from Avondale Quarry stone, were used to create a thermal mass to maximize passive solar heat gain. Coupled with tight construction and a seamless blanket of insulation is a solar thermal heating system installed by Radiant Comfort Systems that utilizes the heat energy of the sun to warm the in-floor radiant system.

South facing wall, designed for maximum solar gain

For those few really cold days, peak-heating demand can be met with two wood burning stoves and a geothermal heat pump.

This is where the wood stove now sits.

All three floors of the home contain radiant heat.  The basement and the first floor are hand troweled concrete which is stained then polished. Both locally sourced labor and material were used to help bolster LEED rating points.  Additionally the recycled content of the concrete was traced and documented to gain additional points. Local, yet nationally recognized, company Hyde Concrete was contracted to transform the concrete from a gray slab of material to a finished product with deep tones of color to create a warm atmosphere.

Hand troweled concrete floors

From the warm leather tones in the finished basement entertainment area to the accents in the terra-cotta first floor the polished concrete brings a modern touch to the home.

Stained and polished concrete floor.

The same solar thermal system provides domestic hot water to the home.  The domestic water system is backed up with a propane fired instant hot water system for peak demand. The hot, humid summers of coastal Maryland posed a comfort challenge.  The home is positioned to take advantage of prevailing winds for natural ventilation and is equipped with large, high-efficiency, operable windows throughout.

Positioned for prevailing winds and natural ventilation

The mechanical system includes passive nighttime cooling through the solar thermal panels with a geothermal heat pump as back up. Regardless of the mode of operation, a healthy indoor air is maintained via Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) that efficiently maintains temperature while introducing fresh air. In addition to using ERV, the home utilizes the radiant system to cool the home.  Radiant cooling along with minimal ducting help control the humidity and allow the home to be comfortable in the summer. HJLCMS utilized a systems approach to construction that reduced site generated waste and construction time while increasing quality control.  The precast concrete foundation wall system from Ideal Walls provides an R-23.5 at the basement walls. The timber frame crafted in the HLTF shop is enveloped by Murus Company Structural Insulated Panels (SIPS) that provides R-40 insulation on the walls and roof. Although there are a number of windows on the south wall for solar gain, windows on the other faces are limited and all windows are high-efficiency Serious Windows, series 700 or 900, providing at least an R-5.6 and SHGC of .21.  Energy modeling shading simulation software was used to determine the most efficient percentage of window area to wall for the North, South, East and West walls. This Off-The-Grid house has exceeded expectations with its performance and intuitive design.  The homeowners are thrilled that their dreams of an up-to-date, sustainable home filled with cutting edge technology have come true without having to sacrifice their craftsman style aesthetic.  This house proves that modern technology can be used in any style home.