The Hansen House Part 13: The Loft

In continuation with the great room, I thought that it would be best to cover the loft area next. The loft consists of a sitting area and a balcony through which the chimney extends up through. Hansen_05-08-13 031 Photo May 09, 2 45 03 PM Hansen_05-08-13 026 The custom fireplace and chimney, made with stone found around the property, was built by Stonescapes Inc. of Hockessin, DE. The intersection of the chimney through the balcony creates a lovely, small sitting area that is a perfect spot to read a book. Hansen_05-08-13 030 Hansen Finished (29) Hansen_05-08-13 033 Hansen Finished (17) The loft also has a larger seating area located above the kitchen. Hansen Finished (7) Hansen_05-08-13 020 Hansen_05-08-13 023 Hansen_05-08-13 027 2 The railings and balusters were hand forged by Harris Metalsmith Studio LLC and are simple twisted picket design, painted Satin Black with an Oak cap rail. Hansen Finished (15) Hansen Finished (27) Hansen Finished (33) The floors in the loft are Wormy Maple. Hansen_05-08-13 024
This door leads to an office/media room as well as the guest room

This door leads to an office/media room as well as the guest room

Above the sitting are in the loft is a cupola. The cupola assists in passive ventilation. Hansen_05-08-13 022 Hansen Finished (16)

The Hansen House Part 12: The Great Room

If you were not familiar with the Hansen House, you would never guess what lies beyond the beautifully handcrafted reclaimed Oak front door.
Custom arched door by Shawn Hollenshead Cabinetry.

Custom arched door by Shawn Hollenshead Cabinetry.

As you walk in the front door and enter through the mudroom, you can either go straight towards the kitchen or go left towards the great room. The Hansen House is a hybrid house, meaning that part of it is timber framed while the rest is stick built. HJLCMS used the energy efficient method of built out walls throughout the house. Blown in insulation creates a super insulated, tight building envelope which increases the efficiency of the house. Hansen Finished (2) Hansen Finished (36) Hansen Finished (45) The Douglas Fir timber frame is the roof truss system above the great room, loft and kitchen. Timber framing allows for high ceilings and open building methods, not to mention that it is gorgeous. The Douglas Fir timbers are stained with Sansin clear finish and the Southern Yellow Pine roof decking is stained with Sansin Camel. Sansin is a low-VOC environmentally friendly product. Hansen_05-08-13 026 Hansen_05-08-13 005 Hansen Finished (42) The great room has beautiful views of the rural farm land that surrounds the property. The Marvin French doors are glazed to enhance energy performance. Glazing means that the window glass that has a clear coating to reflect heat while allowing light to stream in. Hansen Finished (40) Hansen Finished (37) Hansen Finished (4) Reclaimed Oak was used for the flooring and stone found from around the farm was used in constructing the fireplace. 20130509_121343 Photo May 09, 2 45 03 PM  

The Hansen House Part 11: The Kitchen

The workspace of the Hansen House’s kitchen is under the loft while the rest of the kitchen is open to above and out to the great room and dining area.  The open ceiling allows the natural light to flow in through the windows above and all around. IMG_2316 IMG_2330 IMG_2312 The flooring is ungauged slate.  The slate provides a natural earthy coloring and interesting cleft textures to the floor. Photo Feb 22, 11 28 10 AMPhoto Feb 22, 3 26 35 PM The back splash matches the slate on the flooring. IMG_2337 Shawn Hollenshead Cabinetry beautifully constructed the kitchen cabinetry as well was other elements throughout the Hansen House.  The flat panel Shaker doors were made out of soft maple with Sherwin Williams traditional Cherry stain with a sating sheen topcoat. Hansen Kitchen 01Hansen Kitchen 02 All of the doors and drawers are soft close and many have custom elements that were beautifully orchestrated by Shawn Hollenshead Cabinetry. Photo Mar 01, 12 47 47 PM The elegant countertops are made from Uba Tuba granite. IMG_2340IMG_2317 One of the unique features of the kitchen is the window seat with a built-in storage area. Hansen Finished (47) IMG_2328 The window seat is part of the seating area of the kitchen that has magnificent views of the gorgeous grounds.  These views extend throughout the great room, loft, master suite and guest rooms. Hansen Finished (3) Hansen Finished (7) Hansen_05-08-13 006 The kitchen opens up to the dining area and the great room. IMG_2310 IMG_2338

The Hansen House Part 10: The Exterior

After the tar paper was installed on the exterior of the Hansen House, the next step was to install the venting network for the siding.  Venting behind siding is necessary to prevent the major problems that could arise from trapped moisture. Hansen Progress_01-18-13 014 The venting material is cor-a-vent sturdi-strip which runs vertically and cor-a-vent SV-3 which runs horizontally along the exterior of the walls.  The sturdi-strips and SV-3 are crush resistant extruded polypropylene core with fluted airways that provide maximum airflow.  The SV-3 has an enhanced insect screen to prevent insects from getting in behind the siding. Hansen Progress_01-18-13 006 Hansen Progress_01-29-13 002 The siding is the HZ5 product line of HardiPlank.  The HZ5 products are a special substrate composition designed to perform in climates with freezing temperatures, seasonal temperature variations, snow and ice. Hansen Progress_01-18-13 006 Hansen Progress_01-18-13 002 Timber bark is the color of the siding with arctic white trim and soffits. Hansen Progress_01-29-13 022 Hansen Progress_04-03-13 004 The Hansen House has 3 variations to the exterior which give it a unique look.  As you approach the house you encounter the stone wall which is a continuation of the original and existing architecture of the farm. Hansen Progress_04-03-13 002 When you walk around the to the front the stone fades away to classic siding. Hansen Progress_04-03-13 002 Hansen Progress_04-03-13 004 This continues along to the side porch. IMG_8087 Once you get to the back and side of the garage, the siding makes the final transformation into vertical board and batten. Hansen Progress_01-29-13 009 Hansen Progress_02-05-13 002 Hansen Progress_02-05-13 003 The soffit and trim are HZ5 product line in arctic white. Hansen Progress_01-29-13 004 Hansen Progress_01-29-13 007 Hansen Progress_01-18-13 017 Hansen Progress_01-29-13 005 The cupola, where the whole-house fan will be installed to exhaust hot air from the house and for air circulation, has the same siding, soffit and trim as the rest of the house. Hansen Progress_01-29-13 010 Hansen Progress_01-29-13 017 The main roof of the Hansen House is shingled while the porches and overhangs have standing seam metal roofs. IMG_8085 Hansen Progress_01-29-13 003 Hansen Progress_04-03-13 004

The Hansen House Part 9: Insulation & Interior Systems

White PVC pipes run under the slab where the domestic hot and cold running water tubes are housed and run.  These plumbing tubes are part of the Hansen House’s wet wall, a structural wall designed to house plumbing pipes for fixtures like sinks, dishwashers, washing machines and toilets. Hansen_10-08-12_001 Hansen_12-14-12 063 The tubes are connected into the manifold and then distributed throughout the house to the designated fixture.  Consolidating plumbing in a single wall increases efficiency as well as cutting down on building costs. Hansen_12-14-12 024 Hansen_12-14-12 062 The black PEX tubes are for the radiant floor heat which also run to the manifold where the water will be heated by an electric water heater.  The PEX tubing was attached to the rebar which was laid out in a checkerboard pattern on top of the foundation’s 4″ of insulation.  Then concrete was poured to form the slab. Hansen_10-08-12_002 Hansen_07-13-12 005 The kitchen island location and outline were marked by tape on the floor for reference points. Hansen_10-08-12_005 After the plumbing tubes were all in place, the cellulose insulation could be sprayed.  Netting was installed on ceilings and walls to hold the blown in cellulose in place.  The netting was used so that the drywall would not have to be installed before the insulation was blown in, which could cause moisture problems. Hansen_12-14-12 012 Hansen_12-14-12 028 The windows and doors were covered with plastic to be protected during the spray insulation process.  Polyurethane, the yellowish material, was sprayed to seal any plywood seams to ensure a tight building envelope. Hansen_12-14-12 045 Hansen_12-14-12 043 Hansen_12-14-12 044 Because the insulation is blown in an excess of material tends to accumulate; therefore, while one person blows in the cellulose another person vacuums it up where it is sent back to the truck and recycled back through the process. Hansen_12-14-12 102 Hansen_12-14-12 105 The metal braces seen in the picture below are part of the t-bracing which prevents lateral movement.  Rigid foam was added to the cavity so that settling of the insulation was minimized and controlled. IMG_7988 IMG_7989 IMG_7991 IMG_7994

The Hansen House Part 8: The Windows

The black tar paper around the window openings is for durability and to protect the window sills. Hansen_12-12-12 003 Hansen_12-12-12 002 As you can see below, the corners of the openings have water and ice shield for further protection. Hansen_12-14-12 001 The InLine Fiberglass windows are triple pane low-e casements with fold down cranks and colonial grids between the window panes. Hansen_12-12-12 004 Hansen_12-12-12 005 All of the windows in the Hansen House have white exteriors and Oak laminate interiors, except for the windows in the garage which have brownstone exteriors and Oak laminate interiors. DSC00467 DSC00469 Using the window orientation as a reference point to help determine where the sconce should go, our Project Manager had the great idea to put the sconce on a 2×4 and have the homeowner move it up and down the wall to help him visualize where he wanted it placed. Hansen_12-12-12 010 Hansen_12-12-12 013 These exterior shots show the timber framed side porch, without the roof on it yet, and the installed windows.  The Marvin Integrity Center Hinge French Doors with sliding screen are found on by the side porch and off of the front of the great room. DSC00462 DSC00464 This custom entry door’s arch matches the arches of the existing barn and mill house. DSC00476hansen door trimmed The arched door is located under the timber framed entry way which is part of the wrap around front porch. DSC00482 DSC00492 The next post will cover the spray cellulose insulation so check back to learn all about it!

The Hansen House Part 7: Exterior Stone Work

The reclaimed stone for the Hansen house was found on the property.  The original owners had purchased the stone from a church was that being dismantled because it matched the stone used for the original farmhouse. Hansen_11-02-12_002 Hansen_11-02-12_014 Hansen_11-02-12_018 KeeneStone cut 1” is a 3-dimensional drainage device for 1.0” masonry cavity wall applications.  They are designed to catch and hold mortar droppings while allowing moisture to pass through and drain out of the wall as well as suspending mortar drippings above the weep holes to prevent the drainage channels from becoming blocked or clogged. Hansen_11-02-12_017 Hansen_11-07-12_003 Hansen_11-07-12_004 The marble cornerstones are also reclaimed from the property.  On some of these marble pieces, the drill holes from the original mining process. Hansen_11-02-12_009 Hansen_11-02-12_010 Hansen_11-02-12_012 Hansen Progress_11-30-12 004 Hansen Progress_11-30-12 005 The masons from Stonescapes, Inc. did a beautiful job on both the chimney and the stone walls as seen in these amazing detail shots. Hansen_11-07-12_001 Hansen_11-08-12_002 Hansen_11-08-12_003 The arched door matches the radius of the doorways in the barn and the well house. Hansen Progress_11-30-12 006 Hansen Progress_11-30-12 007 These exterior shots show the craftsmanship of the masons and a quick preview of what is to come. Hansen Progress_11-21-12 013 Hansen Progress_11-30-12 003 DSC00482 DSC00492 Check back for the next update on the installation of the windows.

Off-The-Grid Home

Just south of Annapolis, Maryland HJLCMS constructed an off-the-grid home.  Tucked far back from the road the property enjoys the peace and quiet of farmland views and a backdrop of forest. But don’t let the bucolic surroundings or the craftsman appearance fool you. This new residence is a thoroughly up-to-date, sustainable home filled with cutting edge technology that had a very aggressive mission – provide a modern lifestyle for a family of four while minimizing their footprint on the Earth. This project’s environmental highlights include:
  • Creating a beautiful structure that brings joy for many generations
  • Generate all electricity on-site
  • Source all domestic and landscape water from rainwater capture or on-site resources
  • Maintain all storm water on-site through capture or infiltration
  • Use of local tradespeople and utilizing natural, local and/or recycled materials
  • Minimize construction disturbance and waste
  • Create and maintain a healthy indoor environment
  • Off-the-grid living
HJLCMS and Hugh Lofting Timber Framing (HLTF) designed and built the home to work with the Earth.  “The house is sited to maximize passive solar gain in the winter but is designed to be shaded from too much sun in the summer,” says Hugh Lofting, company president. Concrete floors and a real fireplace, made from Avondale Quarry stone, were used to create a thermal mass to maximize passive solar heat gain. Coupled with tight construction and a seamless blanket of insulation is a solar thermal heating system installed by Radiant Comfort Systems that utilizes the heat energy of the sun to warm the in-floor radiant system.

South facing wall, designed for maximum solar gain

For those few really cold days, peak-heating demand can be met with two wood burning stoves and a geothermal heat pump.

This is where the wood stove now sits.

All three floors of the home contain radiant heat.  The basement and the first floor are hand troweled concrete which is stained then polished. Both locally sourced labor and material were used to help bolster LEED rating points.  Additionally the recycled content of the concrete was traced and documented to gain additional points. Local, yet nationally recognized, company Hyde Concrete was contracted to transform the concrete from a gray slab of material to a finished product with deep tones of color to create a warm atmosphere.

Hand troweled concrete floors

From the warm leather tones in the finished basement entertainment area to the accents in the terra-cotta first floor the polished concrete brings a modern touch to the home.

Stained and polished concrete floor.

The same solar thermal system provides domestic hot water to the home.  The domestic water system is backed up with a propane fired instant hot water system for peak demand. The hot, humid summers of coastal Maryland posed a comfort challenge.  The home is positioned to take advantage of prevailing winds for natural ventilation and is equipped with large, high-efficiency, operable windows throughout.

Positioned for prevailing winds and natural ventilation

The mechanical system includes passive nighttime cooling through the solar thermal panels with a geothermal heat pump as back up. Regardless of the mode of operation, a healthy indoor air is maintained via Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) that efficiently maintains temperature while introducing fresh air. In addition to using ERV, the home utilizes the radiant system to cool the home.  Radiant cooling along with minimal ducting help control the humidity and allow the home to be comfortable in the summer. HJLCMS utilized a systems approach to construction that reduced site generated waste and construction time while increasing quality control.  The precast concrete foundation wall system from Ideal Walls provides an R-23.5 at the basement walls. The timber frame crafted in the HLTF shop is enveloped by Murus Company Structural Insulated Panels (SIPS) that provides R-40 insulation on the walls and roof. Although there are a number of windows on the south wall for solar gain, windows on the other faces are limited and all windows are high-efficiency Serious Windows, series 700 or 900, providing at least an R-5.6 and SHGC of .21.  Energy modeling shading simulation software was used to determine the most efficient percentage of window area to wall for the North, South, East and West walls. This Off-The-Grid house has exceeded expectations with its performance and intuitive design.  The homeowners are thrilled that their dreams of an up-to-date, sustainable home filled with cutting edge technology have come true without having to sacrifice their craftsman style aesthetic.  This house proves that modern technology can be used in any style home.